Interaction Check FAQ

At Epocrates, we strive to help the healthcare professionals in our network deliver optimal patient care. As of November 6th, 2013, we've made exciting improvements to the presentation of the drug interactions content in Epocrates - both within the Drug Interaction section of drug monographs and in Interaction Check (MultiCheck).

Here are some frequently asked questions regarding the changes in drug interactions:

Q: What improvements were made to drug interactions on November 6, 2013?
A: The biggest change is the addition of an Overview in the Drug Interactions section. The Overview details the interaction profile for each active ingredient of the drug product. This gives a 'big picture' view of a drug product's overall interaction potential and risks.

Additionally, interaction details are presented at the ingredient level. This helps clinicians better understand the individual drug component(s) responsible for each interaction, allowing them to easily see which component may need to be adjusted, monitored, or substituted.

The drug interactions in Epocrates continues to include identified and evidence-based theoretical interactions that may be either pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic in nature.

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Q: Where, within the Epocrates app, do these changes appear?
A: The changes appear within drug monographs in the Drug Interactions section, within Interaction Check on Android and Apple iOS mobile devices, and within MultiCheck in Epocrates Online.

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Q: Can I stay on the old version of Epocrates?
A: No, the presentation of drug interactions in our old version is not optimal for some drugs and may even be confusing. The individual active components of some combination drug products may interact in multiple ways with the same ingredient of another drug. These interactions display as apparent duplicates in older versions, even though different ingredient pairs are actually responsible for the interaction. Please see examples below.

Please make sure you have the newest version of Epocrates from the App Store or Google Play, then update your clinical content in order to see the changes in our Drug Interaction content.

If you are unable to update, please contact Epocrates Support.

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Q: What are the details of these improvements?
A: Please select a topic below to jump to that section:

Within a drug monograph, the Drug Interactions section displays information in the following subsections.

The newly added Overview screen details the interaction profile for each active ingredient of the drug product. For each active ingredient, the name, pharmacologic class, interaction characteristics, and other information are displayed.

On a mobile device:
In Epocrates Online:

By Category displays interacting ingredients organized according to clinical management (action required by the clinician) with categories such as "Contraindicated", "Avoid/Use Alternative", "Monitor/Modify Tx", and "Caution Advised".

On a mobile device:
In Epocrates Online:

When viewing the list of interactions By Drug*, drugs may now be located by either generic or brand drug name. Previously, only generic drug names were included. Alternative medicines and synonyms are also available in the list.

* Note: By Drug view is only available on Apple iOS devices (i.e., iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, iPad mini.)

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Within Interaction Check on Android and Apple iOS devices, and within MultiCheck in Epocrates Online, potential interactions are organized according to clinical management (action required by the clinician) and utilize such categories as "Contraindicated", "Avoid/Use Alternative", "Monitor/Modify Tx", and "Caution Advised".

Interactions are now detailed at the ingredient level. For multi-ingredient combination drugs, it is possible that an ingredient may interact with each component in a distinct way. Accordingly, the interaction statement (which includes clinical management, possible effects of the drug combination, and the proposed mechanism of interaction) will display each unique interacting ingredient pair. This may help clinicians better understand the drug component(s) for which they may need to adjust the dose, monitor, or seek an alternative.

On a mobile device:
In Epocrates Online:

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